The American Journal of Poetry
"Strong Rx Medicine"®

 

Thomas Rain Crowe

Spell  (poem for electric guitar and voice)

 

The war is over.
Let the war begin.

Let the happy where the sad roads meet
sing songs of love to lovers lost in sand.
To time that gives birth to babies
born as men.
To men made by mothers, alone,
in the runaway dark.
Sounding like bells.

Let the forgiveness fall down on its knees
and beg.
Bring bad luck to beggars banished from bread.
Feeding fire of forget-me-not flames
virgin of heat.

The war is over.
Let the war begin.

Let the eyes of guns go blind
in boathouses
and girls beneath bridges sell sex
to the red in no one’s flags.
And riches turn into rags
that scrub no floors.
Or stash death in someone’s veins.

The war is over.
Let the war begin.

Let the wise ones laugh in oracles at the truth.
The weak wail at walls while
the germs of genesis take over
the empty rooms in tears.
Claimed as abandoned land.
Now that the war is over,
let the war begin.
Be bad business for the death of stars.
Be Romeos cruising the sunset with
their blue guitars.

The war is over.
Let the war begin.

Let the sound of big drums
do the dirty work and deed to the wicked
unlearned to laugh or
fall in love with the sky.
Let the sour breath of banks go sweet
as the sugar in cane.
Let the new horse rise from the battlegrounds
mulched in bones
and
be broadswords better than bombs.
Be bribery to those that are rich
sleepwalking the empty hall of dreams.
Halls full of sadness, of screams.

The war is over.
Gone home to harlots and red rooms.
Gone back to weeping mothers and empty wombs.
Let the war begin.
Born virgin to the lips of wind
blowing mad horns. Blowing hell
‘round the roots of trees leveled by storms.
In this bright darkness.
This world of forms.

The war is over.
Let the war begin.

 

 

 

THOMAS RAIN CROWE is an internationally-published and recognized author of more than thirty books, including the multi-award winning nonfiction nature memoir Zoro’s Field: My Life in the Appalachian Woods (2005); an historical novel The Watcher: Like Sweet Bells Jangled (2015) and several collections of poems including Radiogenesis (2007) and The Laugharne Poems published in Wales in 1997 by Carreg Gwalch. He has been an editor of major literary and cultural journals and anthologies and is founder and publisher of New Native Press (www.newnativepress.org). He is a longtime resident of the Southern Appalachians and lives in the Tuckasegee watershed and the “Little Canada” community of Jackson County in western North Carolina.

 

 

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